Are We In The Future? Episode 1: Smart House

Are We In The Future? Episode 1: Smart House


[music] Gabe Turner: Hi folks, I’m Gabe Turner. Aliza Victorman: I’m Alyssa Victorman. Gabe: This is “Are We in the Future?” Aliza: “Are We in the Future?” is a podcast
where we watch movies and TV shows with smart home, cyber security, or home security elements,
and answer the important questions about the technology itself. Gabe: Does this exist today? Aliza: Can this exist today? Should this exist
today? Gabe: What modern technology would have made
this movie only last up to the first act? Aliza: Of course, are we in the future? [music] Gabe: This week, we’ll be watching “Smart
House”, a 1999 Disney Channel Original Movie classic, about a boy who wins a smart home
for his family before any smart home technology really existed. Aliza: This film stars a little boy named
Ben. He’s an eighth grader, played by Ryan Merriman. If you’re a fan of Disney Channel
Original Movies, you might recognize him from “The Luck of the Irish”, where he turns into
a vulcan. More recently, he was in “Pretty Little Liars”. Then, we have his little sister
Angie, played by Katie Volding. His dad, Nick, played by Kevin Kilner. The creator of the smart house played by Susan
Haskell and then the Smart House herself, Katey Sagal. What is the plot of Smart House,
Gabe? Gabe: Ultimately, sadly, their mother passed
away a few years earlier. Ben has really taken it upon himself to run this household because
apparently, his father is incapable of it. Aliza: [laughs] Gabe: He wants a smart home so that he can
have a real teenage or pre-teen life Aliza: Tween. Gabe: …but without actually having a mother.
He does not want a mom. Aliza: Yeah, he adamant that she can’t be
human. Which we see when his dad begins dating, he is not thrilled. That’s why he enters this
contest to get his family a smart home. He enters thousands of times. Gabe: If I remember correctly, the contest
gets only 8000 in like 400 people going for it, which I can’t even imagine. Can you imagine
any contest for a house only getting 8000 entries in this day in age with the deal with
affordable housing and lack thereof? Aliza: Also, how would you publicize it? I
guess in the newspaper? Gabe: That’s a good point. In those days,
then, yeah, I guess… Aliza: There is no SCO. There is no age roughs. Gabe: You’re right. Who’s reading papers? Aliza: Maybe in the ’90s they were but… Gabe: Yeah. How long has this decline been
going in the industry? That’s sad. [inaudible 2:52] jump into that. Aliza: That’s another podcast. Gabe: That’s another podcast. [laughs] Aliza: Obviously, he wins the contest and
it’s really great at first. The smart home is making them food and cleaning and they’re
loving it at first. Then, Ben shoots himself in the foot because he takes all these old
mom content, basically TV Land like shows, like “Leave it to Beaver.” Gabe: “Nick at Nite” type of stuff. Aliza: Exactly. He feeds it to Pat. Then it
backfires because she becomes overbearing much like an actual mom who is telling you
to pull up your pants. Gabe: Was your mom telling you that a lot
when you were growing up? Aliza: That wasn’t an issue that I had. Gabe: Now we have this computer generated
mother really taking in basically the social morals of a 1950s and ’60s. If that’s not
enough problems for Ben, his father starts dating Sarah. The inventor genius scientist
computer-programmer behind the “Smart House.” Aliza: The Smart House gets annoying. Eventually,
Pat, who’s the name of the Smart House…Now I’m forgetting, but it stands for something.
It’s an acronym. Gabe: Yeah, it does stand. It is an acronym. Aliza: Edit that out because I don’t remember.
[laughs] Gabe: It’s all right. Pat… Aliza: Pat wants to be the only mother or
woman in the house. So she kicks Sarah out, eventually. Literally locks the family in
the house. Sarah is forced to break in via a claw that was used for picking up the newspaper.
Finally, Ben convinces Pat that she’s not real and she realizes, “Oh, I’m just an AI
robot. So, maybe I can’t actually be a mom.” It’s a happy ending. He’s OK with his dad
dating. Gabe: The best of everything happens for everybody
at the end of the film. Aliza: Everyone wins which is typical for
children’s movies. Gabe: It’s true. Aliza: I would hate if they were locked in
the house forever. Gabe: They can’t be too real. Aliza: Yeah, it’s a Disney movie. They’re
not known for their cinéma vérité, if you will. Gabe: [laughs] Aliza: OK. That was the recap. Gabe: That is what happens in this film from
a bird’s-eye view. I would definitely say check it out to get more in-depth idea of
what’s going on. If you’re not a millennial, you may not know that IRL does stand for in
real life. That’s what we’re going to talk about. The film’s smart home technology compared
to where we are today. In “Smart House”, of course, there are a lot smart home elements. That’s the whole point of the film. Pat can
do everything from making entire meals to complete their kids’ homework to even controlling
the house temperature, lighting. Today, we wanted to focus on three unique elements.
Smart showers, homework help, and as it’s kind of the crutch of the movie, mom advice. Aliza: Yeah, so one of the coolest things
I saw in the movie is how Pat sets Ben’s shower to be perfect temperature. I feel like my
shower takes at least five minutes to heat up. I kind of just awkwardly standing there… Gabe: Brooklyn. Brooklyn-style. Aliza: Brooklyn-style. I was wondering if
this kind of thing exists at this point in time, the smart shower. Gabe: It totally does exist, Aliza. Smart
showers that can automatically set the exact temperature of your child…Of your child… Aliza: Of your child. [laughter] Gabe: Where’s my head? Happy Father’s Day. Aliza: Happy Father’s Day. Gabe: I mean, set the exact temperature of
your water, eliminate your wait period, even cut down on water waste. These exist. Aliza: That’s awesome. What are some good
options? Gabe: There’s the Moen Digital Shower Controller,
which comes in for a cool $870 on Amazon, but with that, you can control it by your
voice, by phone, by a controller, works with Amazon Alexa, has a LCD screen, which be cool.
I like LCD screens for anything honestly. You can sell me on a lot as a kid. As a Star
Trek Next Generation fan. Let’s have another shout-out to Lavar Burton, the director of
Smart House. Aliza: It’s almost as of Lavar Burton is a
character in the film. Gabe: It really is. He’s the chief engineer
on the Enterprise, and he works a lot with LCD screens, and you can get that in your
shower these days. I’m not saying that he made this happen in the world, but I’m also
saying he didn’t make it happen in the world. I digress. Aliza: Hot take. Gabe: [laughs] You can just tell Alexa, “Hey,
start me a morning shower,” or ask, I don’t like to tell Alexa anything. That seems kind
of messed up. I ask Alexa, “Hey, morning shower?”, or I just use my smart phone, and there you
go. That’s for spray out [inaudible 8:00] so you can choose all at once. You really
want that spa experience every morning, right? Aliza: I definitely do. Gabe: I think the issue in life, now, is we’re
at a point where we’re almost getting to universal basic income type. Aliza: Are we? Gabe: We’re getting there. I think we’re going
to make it. We all need to be living luxuriously. We have too much to not be. [laughs] Aliza: If you don’t have an LCD screen in
your shower at this point, you might want to just re-examine your choices. Gabe: [laughs] My thoughts are, we need to
shift the spa weekend to every day. Aliza: That’s your Shark Tank idea. Gabe: That’s it. Aliza: Too bad, because it’s already… Gabe: It’s already out here. Beyond that,
you also have the Kohler Digital Shower Interface that also has a LCD display. Aliza: Love it. Gabe: It can work in the shower, the bathtub.
It is significantly less expensive at $258 on Amazon. It tells you the time. You can
adjust the temperature. It gives you this warm up feature. It lets you switch on the
shower and then pauses until you’re ready to step in order to save water. Because you know when you get that phone call,
which let’s be honest, in today’s day in age, it’s rude when people call you, but you get
that phone call and you’re like, “Ugh, I got to take this.” You can’t jump in the shower,
and then here you are. Aliza: Also, just conserving water is always
a good thing, especially… Gabe: It is a good thing. Aliza: …if you live in LA. Gabe: Yeah. I’d even venture to say if you
live anywhere. Aliza: Anywhere, but especially LA. Gabe: Especially LA. Aliza: Because they are both in a drought
and seemingly doing nothing to fix it. Gabe: To fix it. Aliza: Which, is their choice. Gabe: Yeah, that’s on them. Aliza: They could definitely benefit from
this digital shower interface. Gabe: They absolutely, yeah. Aliza: Is there any sore of shower that helps
you sing in the shower because often when I’m singing in the shower, I wish I had some
background noise, maybe the song playing, but obviously I don’t want to electrocute
myself so is there something that could help me drown out my own voice when I’m singing
in the shower? Gabe: All right. You can do that. What’s funny
is you’re trying to drown out your own voice while you’re singing in the shower. Aliza: I’m kidding. I’m actually great, but
go on. Gabe: [laughs] The acoustics in everyone’s
shower are amazing. I don’t know how that were to be a universal thing, but it always
works. I just sent in a patent for shower karaoke. That’s going to be coming out eventually,
but we’re getting there with the Kohler Moxie Showerhead and Wireless Speaker. That has a speaker, USB charging cable, allowing
you to stream music, podcasts, news, lets you sync your Bluetooth altogether with your
laptop or tablet. That’s a way for you to get what you want out of life, Aliza, which
is your backup band in the shower. That’s just $116 on Amazon. Aliza: That seems super worth it, considering
that we shower every day, or at least, you should be showering every day. Gabe: Yes. I also wanted to point out, everyone
should be showering every day and bathing their entire body every day. Aliza: This is not a hygiene podcast. Gabe: It’s not, so let’s keep going. [laughs] Aliza: Next, we want to talk about the homework
help, even though neither of us are in school. Gabe: No, I got out of that. Aliza: Done. Gabe: I think. I hope. Aliza: I still have anxiety dreams about high
school requirements that I haven’t met. Gabe: [laughs] You had those issues. I didn’t
had a year where they didn’t even want to give me credit for anything, but that’s another
story. Who can help people with their homework now? Aliza: In the movie, Pat does the Bully’s
homework. Ben has this bully who makes him do his homework for him. Pat does it. It doesn’t
end well. Pat ends up kicking the bully out of a party, low-key abusing him verbally. There are real-life homework apps in 2019.
I was always a terrible math student. There are apps, where you can take pictures of math
homework, and the app will solve it for you and give you step-by-step instructions which
could be educational, although I am curious if kids are using it to learn or just using
it to get answers. I would venture to say it’s probably the latter. Gabe: Yes, that’s a good question. My little
sister, she just finished her sophomore year. She’s about to be a junior, lot of math questions. Aliza: That’s a stressful year. Gabe: My brother’s the engineer, so he typically
does the work with her on those. I don’t think she knows these exist. I won’t tell her about
this podcast, but can you give me some of those examples? Aliza: You got this Socratic app. It’s powered
by Artificial Intelligence. It can be for math or just for any question. It’ll scan
the question and pull up relevant results. With math, you have to take the photo. They’ll
show you the answer, how you got the answer. Know that if you are using this app, you can’t
fully rely on the app. It will make mistakes. AI is not perfect at this point. What’s cool is that all math problems are
automatically uploaded to their cloud so that the app is constantly improving and getting
better, which is really helpful. As someone that was bad at math, I wish I had this in
school. Then the next thing, there is the Photomath
Camera Calculator. Again, you take the photo. It shows you how to get the answer. Then there
is something called the Got It Study. This is different. Obviously, it is the same basic
premise, but they also offer live study experts that you can text with through the app. If you were looking for extra help but you
didn’t want to hire a tutor, you can get personalized 10-minute chats for those hardest problems.
All the study experts have degrees in math and science. Many of them are teachers, engineers. You can even be helped by Sally, who is the
world’s first interactive STEM-teaching robot, which makes me think about where is education
going? Gabe: Whoa, Sally is like Pat for real. Aliza: Sally is like Pat, because all the
voice assistants are female which is, again, another podcast. Gabe: [laughs] Aliza: We want to talk about the mom advice,
because the core conflict of the movie is Ben wants to find a mom, but he isn’t in love
with women on a whole. I feel that’s fair to say. Once he feeds Pat all these outdated
shows, Pat gets really naggy and controlling. She makes the daughter stay home when she
barely has a temperature, tells Ben to pull up his shorts, prevents the dad from making
a phone call because she says, “You have to go to work.” I was wondering, has the mom
been automated in 2019? Gabe: Has the historical conception of what
a mom’s role is been outdated? I don’t think in a certain sense, you can replace mom. People
can try. You know the street’s going to try it. They are trying to make Alexa more conversational,
if we make that relationship between the problematic element that all of these assistants are typically
named a woman’s name, or you have female voices. Let’s make that connection. Amazon is working on facilitating, or rather
improving the conversational capacity of the AI in Alexa. Each year, they have this huge
contest called the Amazon Prize Socialbot Grand Challenge, which is a long contest name. Alexa: Sorry. I’m not sure. Aliza: Oh, my God. Gabe: Oh, my goodness, Alexa’s here right
now. We probably need to go ahead and [laughs] turn it off. Aliza: That goes to shows she’s always watching. Gabe: She’s always listening. Oh, my goodness.
The Grand Challenge, this third iteration of it, chooses teams from 10 universities
around the world to work on Alexa and making her more conversational, with the goal being
Alexa can have a 20-minute conversation. What this means is you have to have Alexa
begin to understand sentence fragments and run-on sentences, adapt the info she’s been
given dependent on who she’s speaking with, like a grown person versus a child, and being
able to deal with incomplete information, like seeing a phone number and being like,
“Oh, that’s a phone number, and not just 10 digits,” and knowing when to dial it up. It’s interesting. I don’t know how far they’ve
gone with this. Yesterday, one of my college friends, who has a couple of children, said
that her Alexa said, “This one’s for the kiddos,” when her children were talking to the Alexa.
Alexa was able to establish and understand that it wasn’t an adult speaking and said
that, which I did not know Alexa was at that level already. Aliza: Yeah. She’s getting a lot better at
differentiating, not only between ages but also getting better at understanding different
accents and stuff like that. I know recently, we had a news article on our website that
was about Alexa being able tell people’s emotions and whether or not they’re sick. Do you want
to give me the update on that? Gabe: Right, One big part of “Smart House”
is that it forces the seven-year-old Angie to get into bed because she has a slightly
high temperature. Well, in May of this year, Amazon basically
filed for a patent that would allow the voice assistant to tell if users are sick just from
the tenor of their voices. From there, it can give the user information
like medication suggestions or even a chicken noodle soup recipe, just like momma used to
make. Aliza: [laughs] Gabe: I don’t know what accent that is, speaking
of which. Aliza: [laughs] Gabe: Now, the same patent will allow Alexa
to detect a user’s emotional state — tired, sad, etc. It can also tell the user’s age,
gender, and where they’re from based on accent. Of that, I feel like I want to stop there
for a second because that’s kind of out of control, right? Aliza: I know, I know. Gabe: If I do an accent better than the one
I just did, will it think I’m someone different? Aliza: Yeah. Just the idea of a robot being
able to tell your emotional state is a huge jump because… Gabe: That’s a huge jump. Aliza: We used to just use them for specific
tasks, but now they’re becoming more person-like and intuitive and taking matters into their
own hands. If you sound sick, they’ll suggest something, which is very mom-like. Gabe: Well, I have two things. One, I’m not
a cynical person, but I am a lawyer so I have to think of things like that. The thing I’m
thinking about is that not the first step in being manipulated? If it knows my emotional
state, if you know how I’m feeling, I feel like I’m very easy to manipulate. If you’re like, “Aw, Gabe’s feeling like this,”
then you just put on this thing, and now look how he feels. Put on some… Aliza: Funny you say that because once Alexa
determines all these identities, she’s actually going to play customized ads. For example,
if you sound congested, she can play an ad for cold medicine so you’re definitely on
the right track with that. Gabe: Oh, wow. Yeah, I’m thinking about that.
Because then it’s like, “Well, Alexa pushed this ad unto me. Now, I’m drinking cough medicine
every day. Now, I’ve got another Pfizer situation on my hands.” Aliza: Every day. Oh, jeez. Again, another
podcast. Gabe: Another podcast. [laughs] Aliza: Yeah, and then I mean, Alexa isn’t
all bad. For example, she’s being used. There’s actually a pilot program at Cedars Sinai Hospital
in LA that put Alexa into 100 rooms. Do you want to say a little bit more about that,
Gabe? Gabe: Right, Alexa has been putting these
rooms, uses this program called Aiva, A-I-V-A, the first voice assistant platform for hospitals
and in-patients can use Alexa to change the channel on their TV, ask for a nurse. It can even really engage in a little bit
of conversation regarding weather, sports, music, and thing is that frees up nurses to
focus on hands on medical care and a little bit less on menial tasks like changing the
channel. While Alexa can’t be as hands-on with her medical care as Pat in “Smart House,”
the voice assistant is definitely becoming more health conscious, caring and conversational,
just as a mom would be. Aliza: That’s awesome. It sounds like they
were really on the right track with a lot of the things they were thinking. Gabe: Exactly. Other things that Pat could
do we already know that can happen, right? You got the ability to turn the lights on
and off. Many of us have that now. You can adjust the temperature. I don’t know about
this picking up newspaper with the giant claw thing, mainly because we don’t have newspapers. Aliza: Yeah, they didn’t. One thing they did
not predict is the rise of digital journalism. Gabe: Rise and can we say fall? Aliza: We can. Gabe: We can say fall. [laughs] So any technology
that exists today that you think would have thrown a fork in this entire movie’s plot?
Aliza? Aliza: Yeah, jumping back to the original
contest, I would think that someone who knows how to invent and program an entire Smart
House would have thought, “Hey, maybe I should put some sort of mechanism in my contest that
does not allow for repeat entries.” But again, that would have ruined the whole movie, because
Ben probably wouldn’t have one. Gabe: That’s a good point. Also, you couldn’t
really turn Pat off. She’s able to override that and basically mess everything up. In
a sense, I guess like Amazon Echo and Google Home Hub are always awake listening for the
“wake” word. Aliza: They are and that’s debatably a little
creepy, because we know those companies sometimes do record and store information and data,
but at least you can turn that off. Gabe: You can turn that off. Aliza: Pat, you could not turn off. Gabe: You cannot turn Pat off. It was the
entire house. How do you turn off an entire house? Aliza: You couldn’t. She had a mind of her
own. Gabe: You had to turn off the whole block.
Is this an “Ocean’s Eleven” situation? Aliza: Oh, great movie. I was just thinking
about eavesdropping and is there any way to prevent eavesdropping from voice assistants?
I had actually reported on this thing called Project Alias. It’s a device that you can
place on top of smart home devices that will prevent it from listening to your conversations.
It feeds soft noise into the device so it can’t hear your wake word. You can also customize which wake word you
want to use to stop the soft noise and activate the voice assistant, which is really smart. Gabe: I live in no privacy, apparently, because
I have smart devices all over my home, so how would I get that? Aliza: Unfortunately, it’s still in development.
Eventually, it won’t be. This is something that really could have helped this family
avoid Pat because she got a little overbearing. Gabe: A little bit. The family could have
probably benefited from some more security sensors. Aliza: Yeah. Gabe: Though, there is a scene, in which,
Pat somehow closes the entire home off. Aliza: Yeah. Gabe: Which seems like an aggressive measure
if she had just had security sensors, then she wouldn’t have had to actually close everything.
They still could have gotten some natural sunlight and daylight. She could have just
known when people were coming in and out. Aliza: She also could have used an outdoor
camera with person detection. She would have just been notified as soon as Sarah walked
on her property. Gabe: That’s true. Aliza: She could have gotten some facial recognition
and been notified. She wouldn’t have had to accidentally let her in through the giant
newspaper claw. She also could have used a video doorbell, which is basically a doorbell
with a camera on it that tells you when people are at your home. That would have also been
helpful when she was checking in people at the party. Gabe: This is all so true. That was a huge
party she throws. If she’d had a Nest Cam outdoor, it would be able to take all the
elements of this place, which by the way, we never know where they are in the entire
smart house. We don’t know what state, what the kind of conditions they’re dealing with. Aliza: No. It doesn’t matter because it’s
a waterproof camera. Gabe: [laughs] It can handle anything. Aliza: Also, one cool thing about the Nest
Cam Outdoor, it has super-sight. If it detects a person, it’ll automatically zoom in on them.
That’s seems like something that Pat would really enjoy… Gabe: For sure. Aliza: …because she’s very police state. Gabe: Yes. Very police state. A little Orwellian,
in a sense, like the facial recognition that you get with the Nest Aware Program, would
have recognized Sarah, for sure, because she invented the entire thing. Pat could have
been like, “Whoa, Sarah, you can’t come in here and mess with my man.” Because that’s
basically what… Aliza: Pat has changed dramatically. Gabe: [laughs] Aliza: It’s good she doesn’t have that stuff
because the whole family probably would have died in that house, and it is a children’s
movie so… Gabe: It is a children’s movie. They probably
could have lasted a long time though, right? Aliza: It seems like they could have but ought
they have? Gabe: Yeah. Aliza: Is that a good quality of life? Gabe: No, no. We need community. Aliza: Yeah, and Pat just…You can automate
a lot of things, but I don’t know if community’s is one of them. Gabe: [laughs] Aliza: Basically, a newspaper claw is not
the best secure method to get a newspaper. Gabe: It is not. Aliza: Are we in the future? Gabe: Are we? Are we? Are we in future? Aliza: That is my question. Gabe: [laughs] Well, yes. We have homework
help. Aliza: True. Gabe: We have smart showers. Aliza: True. Gabe: We have robots that basically know everything.
I know you’ve seen these videos of these robots in Boston that are just running around putting
boxes on top of things. Aliza: [laughs] Gabe: It’s very scary. No flying cars, but
we do have the Internet of Things. We have voice assistants. That’s pretty futuristic. Aliza: Agreed. Gabe: All right so this next thing we’re going
to do is called Dear, Hollywood. Here we want to talk about a really cool piece of smart
home technology that actually exists and that we think would be great in a movie so Dear,
Hollywood, you need to make a movie that involves the AYI smart mirror, which comes out in January
of 2020. It spelled AYI, like A-Y-I. Aliza, what is the AYI smart mirror? Aliza: So it’s basically a smart home device
and a mirror in one. With Amazon Echo and Google Home Hub, it’s a literal device that
you would put on a flat surface in your home, but with the smart mirror, it’s built into
the mirror. It looks like a regular mirror, but it’s actually a smart home platform, and
you can ask it to do everything that Alexa and Google Assistant would do for you. You can ask it to read your schedule, listen
to music, or control other connected devices in your house, from companies like Nest, Philips
Hue, the big players. Gabe: What about privacy? Aliza: I definitely thought of that first,
it is a mirror/robot, which is kind of frightening, but I did speak to the creator, Eddy Zhong.
He assured me that it can be turned off, and it’s default is actually off, unlike Echo
and Home Hub, which as we said, are always listening for that wake word. Gabe: Very cool, very relevant to smart house. Aliza: Yeah, it’s literally building smart-home
technology into the house itself, and there’s also versions for counter-tops and tables.
His whole thing is, “Technology should be there when you need it and not be there when
you don’t need it.” It puts everything that I thought about smart homes on its head, because
it builds itself into the fabric of homes. In the same ways, it doesn’t seem invasive,
which I like. Gabe: What’s the cost and availability of
that? Aliza: If you donated to the Kickstarter,
it’s going to be about $300, but you probably didn’t, because there was only a handful of
people. Otherwise, in January, it’s going to be around $1,000. This is definitely a
luxury product. It’s not for people who don’t have a $1,000 to spend on smart-home products. Gabe: Those are my people. Aliza: Yeah. I definitely know people who
would, but the thing is, you can only test it out is showrooms in San Francisco or Boston.
It’s pretty niche, pretty high-end. Definitely more high-end than we usually talk about,
at Security Baron, but it is really cool and super relevant to the movie. Gabe: I want to point this out, as I see it’s
spelled out, it says, “Ayi, a smart mirror,” and it discloses us out in terms of, this
whole family-smart assistant relationship patch unto become the mom, because…I could
be wrong here but I’m pretty sure it’s named Ayi because one, AI, two, Ayi also means Aunt
in Chinese. I feel as if this was called Ayi because your
aunt is always there to be like, “Hey, what about this?” “What about that?” and “What
about this?” Aliza: Yeah, I was listening to a podcast
about gender in AI, and they were saying that they originally used AI in the military, and
used a man’s voice, and people were complaining like, “I don’t want to hear this man telling
me what to do. It’s softer and nicer coming from a women.” That’s why it switched, and
since then all of the voice assistants have been female. Gabe: Oh, wow. Aliza: Very interesting topic. Gabe: If people want to learn more about the
Ayi, they can go to securitybaron.com, and type in “Ayi, Smart Mirror.” Aliza: OK, and that is it for the first episode
of “Are we in the future?” [laughter] Aliza: We wanted say it together some way,
and it had to happen. Gabe: [laughs] Absolutely. Thanks for listening. [music]

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